Teamwork logo

My batchmates have always complained that the school administration makes our lives difficult by assigning us to different groups with different people for the many SGDs, preceptorials and other group works that define our medschool life.  One of the teachers told us that there was a reason why admin opted to try this constant reassigning of groups but the reason was never really made clear.  However (because I am a philosophical medstudent and all that), I have figured out the reason.

Doctors work in teams to ensure that a patient is given maximal care.  You don’t always get to choose who you work with.  That’s the point.  Assigning us to different groups for different tasks allows us to develop the necessary skills to deal with other people in a teamwork setting, especially with people we find most difficult to work with.  After all, what is the challenge in working with people you’re already comfortable with?  Constantly assigning us to different groups with different sets of people teaches us how to be professional, ergo thick-skinned, results-driven machines.  Just kidding.

Perhaps it is all about developing the kind of work ethics that we could someday be proud of.  In all honesty, I find working in groups, even partnerships, somewhat stressful but there is one principle that I follow when teamwork is necessary:  always give credit where credit is due but don’t overdo it.  You do your work well and, if you have leftover time, do more/help your teammates out but you don’t just hog all the credit to yourself.  It is, after all, group work.  Contribute to the formation of your teammates by making them do some work that they can be proud of as well.  However, if you are not able to do your work well because of some uncontrollable turn of events, apologize profusely and try to make up for it the next time and do not let your preceptor or your senior think that you’d done work that you hadn’t.  Give yourself enough credit – the operative words being just enough… not too much, not too little.  Just for the sake of fairness and balance.

There are people who I truly admire in my batch, not just for being exceptional leaders, but for being excellent team players.  The thought of working with them excites me because you learn so much from them – how to lead without using a condescending/offending/dominating tone of voice, how to include people without compromising the results, how to allow teammates to recognize their potential without truly pushing, how they praise their teammates for a job well done while themselves trying to keep a low profile.  It is amazing just observing how they go about it.  They’re very inspirational.  They make you want to better yourself.  Tear.

In my opinion, some doctors and even some soon-to-be doctors have this arrogance – a sense of entitlement – that makes it so difficult for them to sometimes see from the viewpoint of the other.  We are not perfect.  We make a lot of mistakes but, if these mistakes were made in a teamwork setting, you, my friend, have got to brace yourself.  Sooner or later, you’d find out you’d been called incompetent bitch or bastardous slacker at least once in your medschool life.  Just kidding, medstudents are not (that) mean.

So, how do you deal with fellow (pseudo-) doctors?  Haha.  I have no freaking idea, man.  I’m still trying to figure it out myself.  Considering the many mistakes I make in a teamwork setting, I’m just really trying to stay out of the rumor mill.  This ain’t professional school, boo.  This is high school with scalpels right here.  Fun.  

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