Going home to celebrate the holidays with my family does not mean that I’d left medicine in the closet in my dorm room to rot for two and a half weeks.  In a family of (mostly) doctors, the topic of conversations usually is (you guessed it) medicine.  By now, you’d think I’d be bored to tears or, at the very least, frustrated with the commonality of it all but no.  As funny as it sounds, I feel more of a (would be) doctor in the company of other doctors who believe that I actually know what I’m talking about as opposed to being in the presence of doctor-teachers who look at me as if I know nothing despite three years of drowning myself in all these medical shiz-nits.  See what I just did there?  I just allowed Pride to run its mouth.

Going home to my hometown also means having to meet up with the few high school classmates I’d chosen to keep in touch with over the years and bumping accidentally into those I’d tried very hard to not come into contact with in the last several years.  With these people, the topic of conversations usually revolves around what everyone else is doing – to put it simply, who’s at the top and who’s at the bottom, who’s the winner and who’s (still) the loser.  I would be a hypocrite if I said I’d never listened intently or asked prodding questions myself but the bottom line is that high school never ends, does it?

As one of my medschool friends would tenderly say, we rise up in people’s estimation with a medical diploma.  The honorable part of me wants to believe that that medschool diploma does not make one better than the other, despite the other thinking it himself already, but the realistic part of me has got to accept that we, as a society, put so much emphasis on education, especially further studies, because acquiring one seems to be tantamount to inevitable future success.  What people seem to forget is that a diploma can only serve its purpose if partnered with the priceless experience necessary to achieve that level of success.

I am halfway through medschool but I froze – totally poleaxed – when I saw a woman fall to the floor in the grocery store a few days ago when a thick holiday crowd was milling about.

The one other thing that made me ashamed of myself as a medical student, besides the fact that I totally went cold and froze as I watched her spontaneously fall, hit the floor, and look disoriented, is the fact that, at that time, I was thankful I wasn’t wearing my white medschool uniform.  Only when people had rushed to her aid did my brain start working again – ticking off the signs and symptoms, trying to come up with differentials etc.  As penance for my inaction, I stood at one side for a good 20 minutes just in case while the grocery store staff brought her a chair and her companion started to fan her.

I don’t like giving excuses so I cannot say that I was not able to help like I’d wanted because I did not have a stet or a pen light or a sphyg because who would I be kidding then?  I thank the good Lord that it was most probably just hypoglycemia or acute mild hypoxia instead of stroke or a seizure.  So, no.  I was not proud to call myself a doctor-in-the-making at that time… and my medschool education did nothing during an emergency situation when this supposed doc was on vacay.

As such, I repeat.  A medical diploma needs the necessary medical experience to be able to achieve expected results.  So, really – I do respect my mentors for they’ve seen more patients and been in more emergent situations compared to me.

I am humbled.  Humbled me shall now go take an ocean swim.  Pass the suntan lotion, please!

Advertisements

Comment and Retorts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s