Tips on Surviving Medical Clerkship

Posted: March 25, 2012 in Under the Medical Sun
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

A few days ago, my batch wrapped up our first three years in medical school with a week-long “celebration” marked with a series of written, oral, and skills exams. Now, we are officially done with classroom-based learning and are (supposedly) ready to embark on a journey of gaining knowledge from the hospitals full-time.

On the last day after our final exams, the batch partied in a way only medical students knew how – wildly. Prior to that however, the lower year level and the school administration threw us a send-off party, where a couple of people who’d gone before us gave us tips on how to survive clerkship. One of our favorite doctor-teachers, who specializes in obstetrics-gynecology, also wrote each one of us a few tips on how to survive not only clerkship but also internship and residency as well. I’m collating all of their tips here and philosophizing on each one because, despite being medical clerks, we are still extremely philosophical beings.

  1. Remain humble; in short, don’t be a primadonna since you are the “lowest animal in the food chain.” How can we not respect the hospital peking order? Learning from the experience of other people is a privilege. Why be a primadonna over that?
  2. Always show professionalism; don’t answer back. I used to think that being professional meant doing your job and, as much as possible, doing it well. It sucks that it actually also means doing it with a smile on your face, which transparent faces could sometimes be unable to do when faced with lack of sleep, food, and camaraderie. How do you hold your tongue when you can’t even hear yourself thinking?
  3. Always smile; kill them with kindness. We have to admit that, when faced with an extremely disagreeable person, killing him/her with kindness instead of with violence is quite hard, if not humanly impossible, to do.
  4. Take the initiative; always go the extra mile. I was telling a friend the other day that one of the advantages of living away from family during medical school is the absence of familial obligations. It’s a sad but somewhat valuable fact at this point in our training.
  5. Look forward to a “toxic” duty.  I cannot remember a lot of things from the lectures but I am hoping sincerely that I learn from doing.  So yes, bring all the toxics!  I just hope I don’t unwittingly kill a lot of people in the process.
  6. Be assertive without being aggressive. Middle children, which I am, are particularly flexible and good compromisers but, having been surrounded with testosterone growing up, being aggressive in the face of apparent attack is what I know how to do. How do you fix that part of yourself in a little over a month?
  7. Be confident without being cocky. In all honesty, I have no idea how one can be cocky when one is at the bottom of the food chain. It’s like trying to be the alpha male when one is apparently a puppy. Furthermore, if one has no idea what one is doing, I am not sure the line “confidence is key” applies.
  8. Pray. Human limitation is the most common reason why our actions, our knowledge, our ability to be kind and understanding, and our endurance can only go so far.

Perhaps the most important thing medstudents can learn from shadowing their seniors is this rare virtue called humility.  The medical field is rife with people with egos the size of Jupiter, which in some way could be understandable given the vast amount of knowledge they have had access to over the years and given that they literally hold other people’s lives in their hands.  Maybe they have a right to those egos?  Gee, I don’t know but, before they were doctors with big egos, they had been medstudents with even bigger egos… and the medical training system had found a way to ensure that those ego could be brought down a peg or two… or a thousand.

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Comments
  1. parkerlittle says:

    Number 3 will be my toughest obstacle.

  2. Thanks so much for giving me a shout out! Don’t worry– you’ll get through this! After all, the hands-on patient care you’re going to take part in during 3rd year is the reason you went to medical school in the first place!

    Good luck!

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